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Energia survey shows three small changes can reduce an individual’s carbon emissions by over 1000kg annually

PICTURE: 

Lowering the temperature on your washing machine and avoiding the tumble drier could save the same volume of CO2 annually as used to make nearly a quarter of a million cups of tea.

An Energia snapshot survey has found that households could reduce their carbon dioxide emissions by 1,127kg annually by making three small switches. The energy usage research illustrates how simple changes can have a meaningful energy efficiency and environmental impact.

The survey, which was conducted as part of the Energia Home Energy Challenge at the recent Ideal Home Show included responses from close to 300 households, and found:

  • If all respondents were to wash their clothes at the cooler 30-degree setting for one year and avoid the tumble dryer, it could prevent 157,781kg of carbon dioxide being emitted into the Earth’s atmosphere, the equivalent volume of CO2 produced in the making of 2,254,014 cups of tea.

  • 5 showers per week is widely considered to be the average number of showers per week yet participants were found to have an above average number of showers, recording 6 per week. This means that if all respondents were to take a minute off their shower time, they would save 72,181kg carbon dioxide emissions over one year.

  • The survey also found that the average attendee had 28 lightbulbs in their home, simply switching out these regular lightbulbs for LED bulbs could prevent the emission of 315kgs of carbon dioxide over 12 months per household.

Tricia Murray, Energy Services Manager at Energia said: “At Energia, we recognise that we all need to be ambitious in protecting our environment. With a government target of 500,000 Irish homes to be retrofitted to a BER B2 standard or above by 2030, we can see that communities across the country are engaging to meet this objective.

“Household energy is today responsible for a quarter of energy related CO2 emissions, so upgrades to households and schemes such as the Cosy Home Scheme will play an important part in the overall reduction of emissions from Ireland. Such upgrade work is an investment on several fronts for a household and as such, the scheme provides not only grant and financial support, but also expert advice to facilitate an informed decision when investing and undertaking works”.

For those looking to reduce their emissions even further, Energia’s Cosy Home Scheme is a one stop shop for deep retrofit projects, including new SEAI grants of up to €35,000.

For more information visit www.energia.ie/cosy-homes.

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